OUR BUILD of a SUNCAT 40' MKII







One topic overlooked in the boatbuilding experience is the area and enclosure in which to build in. The ground not needing to be perfectly flat and level but makes the work area more comfortable if it is. If the work space is not constructed to the final size needed to complete the build make sure there is room for expansion. The tree in the foreground has since been leveled to make room for the larger Space needed to build the bridgedeck between the hulls.
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Materials used to construct the Space.
First we have to keep in mind that we are not in the shed building buisness and the primary goal is to build a boat. Material cost should be kept to a minimum but the SPACE has to out live the time it takes to complete the project.
I've found 2" PVC pipe to be a very inexpensive and rugged framing material. Approx .35 cents a foot. It can be cut to lenght using the same tools as in woodworking and can be fastened with simple dry wall screws. Its strength,weight and resiliance to bounce back allows the framing to be placed at every 4'. Saving on lumber which I would not recommend to be placed more than every 2'
Pine or fir strapping can be used to lock the PVC frames together. Normal cost for strapping can run between .13 and .17 cent a foot. PVC fittings were the most expensive cost, but shopping around they could be found as low as .21 cents each and the high end being .69 cents.
The whole SPACE was then covered with a blue poly tarp. In this case a 40'x60' would do the job. The best place to find inexpensive tarps are at surplus or salvage stores. We paid $79 for this one.
Attaching the tarp was a trick I learned over time. Securing tightly to the windward side of the SPACE and then draping it over and hanging the opposite side with weights. This allows some movement in high gusts of wind reducing the stress on the actual framing. This also stretches the tarp tight over time as the material relaxes.
A center ridge pole was placed in the event of a heavy snow but is not needed in most parts of the country. We removed the poles while working and replaced them when inclimate weather was predicted.
This particular shed has withstood wind storms in excess of 50mph gusting to almost 70mph.
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The power of solar heating can be very difficult to work with when laminating. Ceiling heat can reach over 120 deg when the sun is out. It will also drop drasticaly when the sun goes down. We have found that when working with resin, temp control is very critical. Hardners are adjusted to meet the temp at the start. If there is a temp change during the lamanating process the resin will either kick off earlier or not kick at all.
The solotion to this problem was to insulate the ceiling to control a constant temp. These 4'x8'X1" white foam panels served a multiple purpose. They not only controlled the temp but the white colored panels also distributed the light which was lost more evenly. These sheets are very inexpensive. Approx $5. per sheet but has to be handled very carefully while installing. Its a very light material and is not recommened to be handled on a windy day.
The large stack of foam in the photo is not recommended to be used on the SPACE. This is Corecell PVC linear foam and cost approx $79. a sheet. Although a very rugged foam, the cost will limit this foam to Boatbuilding only.
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OUR REDESIGNED SHED


The beauty of using PVC pipe is the ability to expand as the build progresses.
The new shed is 58'x 35' and 16' to the ridge.
This should allow enough room to complete the build.
The interior wood supports are not needed but we live in Maine where snow can accumulate in a short period. We do vacation often and this gives us peace of mind while away.


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The ceiling and wall panels are 4'x8'x1/2" foam insulation panels that cost $5.00 a sheet. This product is multi pourpose. It lets the rain and snow slide right off without getting caught in the framing and Keeps the place evenly heated. In the summer months when the sun is at its hottest. The ceiling keeps the shed temp at a nice cool temperature.

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Ventilation
This is a must and I've found that using portable fans that can be moved around to ajust ceiling temperature or give the long SPACE an even temp.
This also helps the breathing situation when the resin begins to kick and the styrene fill the air. These little round air fans move a lot of CFMs for their cheap price.
Now that winter has set in and the SPACE has to be heated. Fans are placed above the mold table to bring the ceiling heat down and make the workplace more comfortable and the table evenly heated.
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